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CBT Reduces Shame in Individuals with Social Anxiety Disorder

According to a recent study published in Plos One, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) may help reduce experiences of shame (specifically associated with how individuals judge themselves) among patients diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (SAD.) Participants (n= 161) in the current study were initially evaluated for experiences of shame, guilt, depression, and social anxiety. Participants diagnosed with SAD (n=67) were assigned to a CBT treatment condition; the remaining participants (n=94) were…
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The Shift of EEG Activity in SAD Patients Treated with CBT

Researchers are investigating the neurological effects of therapeutic interventions on patients with a variety of disorders, including PTSD, but few studies have focused on the neurological effects of CBT on patients with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD).  Emotional processing occurs in both sides of the frontal brain.  The right area of the frontal brain is associated with negative emotions and the left area with positive emotions.  The present study uses this…
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From Kafka to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Using Trial-Based Thought Records on Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

A recent study investigated the efficacy of Trial-Based Thought Records (TBTR) as an alternative to conventional Cognitive Therapy in the treatment of patients with generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD).  SAD is the most common form of anxiety disorder and an important target of therapy is the modification of patients’ negative core beliefs.  Based on the idea of “self-accusation” suggested in Kafka’s The Trial, Dr. Irismar Reis de Oliveira devised the…
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