Join us in celebrating our 25th anniversary

Guest Blogger Dr. Judith Beck: Helplessness

I recently presented a Master’s Clinician Class at the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. My topic was cognitive conceptualization of personality disorders. I asked for a volunteer to describe a case so as a group, we could conceptualize the client, using the Cognitive Conceptualization Diagram (Beck, 2005). I have changed certain details to protect the client but his difficulties are fairly typical of someone with avoidant personality disorder. Joe…
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What research is Dr. Beck presently involved in? (Students Ask Dr. Beck – Part SEVEN)

This is the seventh question from the Q&A portion of Beck Institute's 3-Day CBT Workshop on Depression and Anxiety for students and post-doctoral fellows, held on August 15 - 17, 2011. In this video Dr. Aaron Beck discusses research he is presently involved in and/or leading at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Beck explains the work being done by three different teams within his unit; including clinical trials with suicidal…
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Note taking in Session

Recently, there’s been an interesting discussion on the Academy of Cognitive Therapy listserv about the therapy notes patients take home with them to review. Here’s how I make sure a patient is able to remember important ideas we discussed in treatment, specifically the changes a patient makes in his thinking:

Generally, when I ascertain that the patient has modified his thinking during a session (e.g., following Socratic questioning,, behavioral experiments, roleplaying, etc.), I’ll ask the patient for a summary. I might say:

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Beliefs Can Interfere with Treatment Adherence

I recently read an interesting case description on a professional listserv about a "difficult" client who was not fully adherent with treatment. Apparently he argued with his therapist and did little homework outside of the session. It was apparent to me that the therapist had made a mistake. She was continuing to try to deliver "standard" CBT treatment, without attending to the therapeutic relationship sufficiently. I hypothesized that the client…
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When patients get angry in session

Judith S. Beck writes in: Some therapists are quite concerned about their patients becoming angry at them. Yet when therapists respond sensitively, they can help patients learn important lessons. The first thing I do when a patient becomes angry is to elicit their automatic thoughts and positively reinforce them, in a genuine way. "I'm so glad you told me that." And I am glad. If there's a problem, I want…
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Setting the Agenda in session

A frequent question I'm asked by clinicians who are not cognitive therapists is why we set agendas toward the beginning of sessions with patients. They often think that doing so will result in their missing out on important information. I tell them that we've found the opposite to be generally true. We ask patients, "What problems do you want my help in solving today?" and guide them into naming the…
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