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Category: Students and Trainees

Goal Setting to Engage Adolescents

CBT for Youth By Torrey Creed, PhD Many adolescents begin treatment on a different footing from adults. Rather than choosing to start treatment, adolescents may be referred by someone else for behavior the adolescent sees as justified, appropriate, or a part of their identity rather than something to be changed. Other adolescents may be referred for treatment for behavior or situations they feel hopeless or helpless about, and may therefore enter…
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An Introduction to the Suicide Mode

CBT for Suicide Prevention By Marjan Ghahramanlou-Holloway, PhD In 1996, Aaron Beck proposed the concept of “modes” to describe the “synchronous interactions” among the cognitive, affective, physiological, motivational, and behavioral systems of personality. To understand the construct of the suicide mode, consider the case of Richard, a 25-year-old graduate student with recurrent depression. Richard discovers shortly after the New Year that he has failed his comprehensive exams. The example below illustrates…
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Integrating Mindfulness into CBT

Integrating Mindfulness into CBT By Robert Hindman, Ph.D.Beck Institute Faculty A recently published journal article reviewed the empirical support for mindfulness-based interventions for common psychiatric disorders (Hedman-Lagerlof, Hedman-Lagerlof, & Ost, 2018). The authors concluded that the evidence base for using mindfulness-based interventions in the treatment of psychiatric disorders was weak. While other studies have found mindfulness-based interventions to be promising (e.g., Hofmann, Sawyer, Witt, & Oh, 2010), the conclusion of the review article…
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Denial in Substance Use

CBT for Alcohol and Substance Use Disorders By Cory Newman, PhD, ABPP Therapists who treat patients struggling with alcohol and other substance use problems are familiar with the problems of under-reporting, minimizing, and denial. Under-reporting means that the patient is willing to disclose that he or she partakes of alcohol and/or other substances, but does not report the full amount either because of low self-awareness, self-serving bias, shame, and/or fear of anticipated consequences (e.g., being…
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