Join us in celebrating our 25th anniversary

Category: Other

“Hey doc, are you in recovery too?”

“Hey doc, are you in recovery too?” By Cory Newman, PhD, ABPP Patients sometimes express curiosity about their therapists by asking them personal questions. When treating patients who suffer from alcohol and other substance use disorders, it is not uncommon for therapists to be on the receiving end of questions such as, “Are you in recovery too?” or “Have you ever used [insert name of substance]?” or “Haven’t you ever…
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The Evolution of CBT in Community Mental Health

The Evolution of CBT in Community Mental Health Aaron T. Beck, MD Part 2 of 3 (Read part 1, A Biography of Cognitive Behavior Therapy) At some point, Cognitive Therapy morphed into what was then called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and continued to be quite popular.  It turned out to be widespread, and people came to us from all over the world for training.  However, I had a nagging feeling that we…
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Positive Reinforcement

Positive Reinforcement "Clients should always be positively reinforced for expressing their doubts and concerns about therapy or the therapist. " Judith S. Beck
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Change in Dysfunctional Beliefs About Sleep in Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia

Abstract As part of a larger randomized controlled trial, 188 participants were randomized to behavior therapy (BT), cognitive therapy (CT), or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. The aims of this study were threefold: (a) to determine whether change in dysfunctional beliefs about sleep was related to change in sleep, insomnia symptoms, and impairment following treatment; (b) to determine whether BT, CT, and CBT differ in their effects on dysfunctional beliefs;…
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A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and a Topical Steroid for Women With Dyspareunia

Abstract OBJECTIVE: This 13-week randomized clinical trial aimed to compare group cognitive-behavioral therapy (GCBT) and a topical steroid in the treatment of provoked vestibulodynia, the most common form of dyspareunia. METHOD: Participants were 97 women randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment conditions and assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment and 6-month follow-up via structured interviews and standard questionnaires pertaining to pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire, 11-point numerical rating scale of pain during…
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