The Principles of Recovery and Values in CBT

The following is a description of a consultation Dr. Beck had about an individual who has schizophrenia. Mary is a 47-year old woman who is upset about hearing voices (and hackers who will not leave her alone). She is divorced, unemployed, and somewhat hopeless. She has a good relationship with her 13-year old son.

Goal Setting: The Shift from Desensitization of the Negative to the Self-Actualization of the Positive

The new emphasis is directed towards the discussion and visualization of the objectives themselves, thus the emphasis is away from removing the blocks to a positive motivation and to the increase of the motivation itself.

A Revolutionary Idea: The Pathway to Low-Functioning in Schizophrenia

We hoped to discover psychosocial factors that could become targets for treatment interventions. This led us to examine the role of defeatist attitudes, which correlated with both neurocognitive impairment and functioning (Grant & Beck, 2009).

Notes from Dr. Aaron Beck’s Current Research

Our President Emeritus, Dr. Aaron Beck and colleagues recently published an article on their current research: What accounts for poor functioning in people with schizophrenia: a re-evaluation of the contributions of neurocognitive v. attitudinal and motivational factors.

Approaches to “Acting Out” Behavior in Individuals with Schizophrenia

In this integrative approach, the holistic strategies and the linear strategies to “Acting Out” behavior can complement each other.

The Holistic Model

In contrast to this compartmentalized approach, our holistic model views the individual as unique–with specific aspirations, yearnings, and needs.

Realizing the Mass Public Benefit of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies: The IAPT Program

The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) program is working to close the gap between quality care and individuals needing effective treatment through their research and training initiative.

New Breakthroughs in Cognitive Therapy: Applications to the Severely Mentally Ill (Part 3)

When we work with individuals with schizophrenia who have been hospitalized for many years, we need to find out what their needs are. We are often able to draw on their delusions. For example, six inpatients had delusions that they were God or Jesus. To our surprise, several of the individuals responded to the question, “What is good about being God?” with the response, “You can help people.”

New Breakthroughs in Cognitive Therapy: Applications to the Severely Mentally Ill (Part 2)

I posited that if cognitive therapy were truly effective, then it should work on the most severely mentally ill. The three steps we followed were:

New Breakthroughs in Cognitive Therapy: Applications to the Severely Mentally Ill (Part 1)