The Diabetes Problems We Aren’t Talking About

Approximately 65% of people living with type 1 diabetes, and 50% of people living with type 2 diabetes believe that this condition negatively affects their self-confidence and their ability to take on life’s challenges.

Intrinsic Motivation

In our work with dieters, we have found that many (if not most) rely very heavily on the scale going down as an external reward for their hard work. They believe that if they were perfect, or close to perfect, on their diets, the scale should go down, if not every day, then certainly every week. This is problematic because the scale simply doesn’t work that way.

Depression and Chronic Illness

How Cognitive Therapists Can Contribute to Patient Well-Being

Internet versus face-to-face group cognitive-behavioral therapy for fibromyalgia: A randomized control trial

New Study (1)Abstract:

Background:The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy (iCBT) in treating fibromyalgia (FM) compared with an identical protocol using conventional group face-to-face CBT.
Methods:Sixty participants were assigned to either (a) the waiting list group, (b) the CBT group, or (c) the iCBT group. The groups were assessed at baseline, after 10 weeks of treatment, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. The primary outcome measured was the impact of FM on daily functioning, as measured by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). The secondary outcomes were psychological distress, depression, and cognitive variables, including self-efficacy, catastrophizing, and coping strategies.
Results: In post-treatment, only the CBT group showed improvement in the primary outcome. The CBT and iCBT groups both demonstrated improvement in psychological distress, depression, catastrophizing, and utilizing relaxation as a coping strategy. The iCBT group showed an improvement in self-efficacy that was not obtained in the CBT group. CBT and iCBT were dissimilar in efficacy at follow-up. The iCBT group members improved their post-treatment scores at their 6- and 12-month follow-ups. At the 12-month follow-up, the iCBT group showed improvement over their primary outcome and catastrophizing post-treatment scores. A similar effect of CBT was expected, but the positive results observed at the post-treatment assessment were not maintained at follow-up.
Conclusions: The results suggest that some factors, such as self-efficacy or catastrophizing, could be enhanced by iCBT. Specific characteristics of iCBT may potentiate the social support needed to improve treatment adherence.

Vallejo M. A., Ortega J., Rivera J., Comeche M.I. & Vallejo-Slocker L.(2015). Internet versus face-to-face group cognitive-behavioral therapy for fibromyalgia: A randomized control trial. J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Sep;68:106-13. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.06.006. Epub 2015 Jun 20.

CBT in Specialized Medical Centers

CBT studyThis article is an introduction to the second issue of a two-part special series on integrating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) into medical settings. The first issue focused on integrating CBT into primary care, and this issue focuses on implementing CBT in other specialty medical settings, including cancer treatment, HIV care, and specialized pediatric medical clinics. Models for treatment delivery to improve ease of implementation are also discussed, including telehealth and home-delivered treatment. The six articles in this series provide examples of how to transport CBT techniques that are largely designed for implementation in outpatient mental health settings to specialized medical settings, and discuss unique considerations and recommendations for implementation.

Magidson, J. F., & Weisberg, R. B. (2014). Implementing cognitive behavioral therapy in specialty medical settings. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 21, 4, 367-371.

Guest Blogger Dr. Judith Beck: CBT for Diabetes

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is usually short-term, goal-directed, and skills based. Therapists help patients identify and solve problems and learn specific skills to change their thinking and behavior so they can make lasting changes in their behavior and general functioning. At each session, patients record responses to their unhelpful and inaccurate thinking, along with steps they have committed to take in the coming week.

A growing body of literature has demonstrated the effectiveness of CBT for people with diabetes. For example, a randomized controlled trial published last year in Diabetes Care showed that CBT enhanced treatment adherence and decreased depression in type 2 diabetes patients. In this study, participants received either enhanced usual care or enhanced usual care plus a CBT intervention. Four months after treatment, the group receiving CBT intervention showed greater improvements in medication adherence, depressive symptoms, and diabetes control compared to the usual care group. At the 8-month follow up, the CBT intervention group maintained their gains in adherence and diabetes control.
As an example, a patient might react to a high blood glucose reading by thinking, “This is horrible! I’ll never get my diabetes under control. I’m a failure.” He may then feel sad, become discouraged, and give up on trying to manage his disease. In CBT treatment, therapists help patients identify and modify their automatic, negative thoughts and unhelpful behaviors. They teach them specific, empowering skills to help them manage their disease. Thus, with the help of CBT, instead of thinking “I’m a failure” and wanting to give up, the patient thinks, “This reading is high. I better take steps to get it under control.”

Reference:
Safren, S. A., Gonzalez, J. S., Wexler, D. J., Psaros, C., Delahanty, L. M., Blashill, A. J., Margolina, A. I., … Cagliero, E. (February 20, 2014). A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adherence and Depression (CBT-AD) in Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care, 37, 3, 625-633.

Acceptance-Oriented CBT with Highly Distressed Rheumatic Disease Patients

CBT studyOBJECTIVE: To examine the potential effectiveness of a multimodal rehabilitation program including an acceptance-oriented cognitive-behavioral therapy for highly distressed patients with rheumatic diseases.

METHODS: An observational study employing a one-group pre-post test design (N=25). The primary outcome was psychological distress. Secondary outcomes were quality of life, illness acceptance, and coping flexibility. Group pre-to-post and pre-to-12 months follow-up treatment changes were evaluated by paired-samples t-tests and Cohen’s effect sizes (d). Individual changes were evaluated by the reliable change index (RCI) and clinically significant change (CSC) parameters.

RESULTS: Significant effects were found post-treatment and maintained at 12 months in psychological distress (d>0.80), illness acceptance (d=1.48) and the SF-36 subscales role physical, vitality, and mental health (d ? 0.65). No significant effects were found for coping flexibility and the SF-36 subscales physical functioning, bodily pain, social functioning, and role emotional. Both a reliable (RCI) and clinically significant (CSC) improvement was observed for almost half of the highly distressed patients.

CONCLUSION: The patients enrolled in the multimodal rehabilitation program showed improved psychological health status from pre to post-treatment.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: A randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm or refute the added value of an acceptance-oriented

Vriezekolk, J. E., Eijsbouts, A. M., van, L. W. G., Beenackers, H., Geenen, R., & van, . E. C. H. (2013). An acceptance-oriented cognitive-behavioral therapy in multimodal rehabilitation: a pre-post test evaluation in highly distressed patients with rheumatic diseases. Patient Education and Counseling, 91, 3, 357-63.

CBT Helps Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Cope with Pain

OBJECTIVE: Two psychological interventions for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are cognitive-behavioral coping skills training (CST) and written emotional disclosure (WED). These approaches have developed independently, and their combination may be more effective than either one alone. Furthermore, most studies of each intervention have methodological limitations, and each needs further testing.

METHOD: We randomized 264 adults with RA in a 2 × 2 factorial design to 1 of 2 writing conditions (WED vs. control writing) followed by 1 of 2 training conditions (CST vs. arthritis education control training). Patient-reported pain and functioning, blinded evaluations of disease activity and walking speed, and an inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein) were assessed at baseline and 1-, 4-, and 12-month follow-ups.

RESULTS: Completion of each intervention was high (>90% of patients), and attrition was low (10.2% at 12-month follow-up). Hierarchical linear modeling of treatment effects over the follow-up period, and analyses of covariance at each assessment point, revealed no interactions between writing and training; however, both interventions had main effects on outcomes, with small effect sizes. Compared with control training, CST decreased pain and psychological symptoms through 12 months. The effects of WED were mixed: Compared with control writing, WED reduced disease activity and physical disability at 1 month only, but WED had more pain than control writing on 1 of 2 measures at 4 and 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS: The combination of WED and CST does not improve outcomes, perhaps because each intervention has unique effects at different time points. CST improves health status in RA and is recommended for patients, whereas WED has limited benefits and needs strengthening or better targeting to appropriate patients.

Lumley, M. A., Keefe, F. J., Mosley-Williams, A., Rice, J. R., McKee, D., Waters, S. J., Partridge, R. T., … Kalaj, A. (2014). The Effects of Written Emotional Disclosure and Coping Skills Training in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 82, 4, 644-658.

Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy is Effective for Severe Health Anxiety

OBJECTIVE: A sudden gain is defined as a large and stable individual improvement occurring between two consecutive treatment sessions. Sudden gains have been shown to predict better long-term improvement in several treatment studies, including cognitive behavioural therapy for depression and anxiety disorders, but have not been studied in the treatment of health anxiety or any form of internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of sudden gains in internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for severe health anxiety.

METHOD: We examined the occurrence and significance of sudden gains in measures of health anxiety in 81 participants receiving internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy. We compared patients with sudden gains, patients without sudden gains, and patients with gradual gains.

RESULTS: Thirteen participants (16%) experienced one sudden gain in health anxiety with individual sudden gains distributed across the treatment. As expected, patients with a sudden gain showed larger improvements than patients without a sudden gain at post-treatment (d = 1.04) and at one-year follow-up (d = 0.91) on measures of health anxiety.

CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with previous studies, sudden gains in internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy are associated with significantly larger and stable treatment effects up to one-year follow-up.

Hedman, E., Lekander, M., Ljotsson, B., Lindefors, N., Ru?ck, C., Hofmann, S. G., Andersson, E., … Schulz, S. M. (January 01, 2014). Sudden gains in internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for severe health anxiety. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 54, 22-9.