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Category: Aaron T. Beck

Extramural Training Workshop at Beck Institute: October 19-20, 2009

OCT/2009: (Left) Dr. Aaron Beck answers questions after conducting a live patient session that was viewed (via closed-circuit television) by participants in the Extramural Training workshop. The workshop was attended by psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, professors, physicians, nurses, and other professionals. Participants traveled from China, Hong Kong, United Kingdom, and ten U.S. states. The Extramural Training program provides intensive, one-on-one supervision to professionals seeking to enhance their clinical Cognitive Behavior…
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Cognitive Therapy of Anxiety Disorders: Science and Practice

We asked David A. Clark to send us a description of the excellent, state-of-the-art new book on anxiety he co-authored with Aaron Beck, along with some behind-the-scenes history. Here’s what he wrote: Cognitive Therapy of Anxiety Disorders: Science and Practice (Clark & Beck, 2010, from Guilford Press, pp. 628) represents the outgrowth of my 26 year journey of inquiry, discovery and acquired knowledge on the cognitive basis of the emotional…
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CBT Meta-Analysis Review is Most Downloaded Article in CPR

It looks as if the research efficacy of Cognitive Therapy is becoming more well-known. Clinical Psychology Review is a peer-reviewed journal that publishes substantive reviews of topics relevant to clinical psychology. The most downloaded article from this important journal is The empirical status of cognitive-behavioral therapy: A review of meta-analyses (Volume 26, Issue 1, January 2006, Pages 17-31), authored by Andrew C. Butler, Jason E. Chapman, Evan M. Forman and…
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Empirically Validated Treatments

There have been very interesting posts on the www.academyofct.org listserv this week, about the necessity (1) to validate the theory underpinning a particular treatment approach, (2) to insure that treatment is based on this validated formulation, and (3) to validate the efficacy of the treatment itself. A particular technique or strategy, devoid of a coherent and tested underlying theory, should not be labeled as an "empirically validated treatment," much less…
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