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Policy-makers, payers, and consumers often make decisions based on therapists’ reported theoretical orientations, but little is known about whether these labels represent actual or potential skills. Prior to CBT training, therapists (n = 321) reported theoretical orientations. Experts rated CBT competency using the Cognitive Therapy Rating Scale Therapy at pre-, mid-, and post-training. CBT- and non-CBT identified therapists showed equivalent, non-competent baseline CBT skills. CBT-identified therapists showed greater CBT skills at mid-training, but by end of training, groups evidenced equivalent achieved competency. Baseline CBT orientations were neither valid, nor useful markers of later competency. Policy, clinical and research implications are discussed.

Creed, T.A., Wolk, C.B., Feinberg, B., Evans, A.C., & Beck. A.T. (2014). Beyond the label: Relationship between community therapists’ self-report of a cognitive behavioral therapy orientation and observed skills. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. doi: 10.1007/s10488-014-0618-5.