Join us in celebrating our 25th anniversary

CBT & Social Anxiety Disorder

We examined whether Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) would modify self-reported negative emotion and functional magnetic resonance imaging brain responses when reacting to and reappraising social evaluation, and tested whether changes would predict treatment outcome in 59 patients with SAD who completed CBT or waitlist groups. For reactivity, compared to waitlist, CBT resulted in (a) increased brain responses in right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), inferior parietal lobule…
READ FULL ARTICLE

Workshop Participant Spotlight – Natasha Mullen, LPCMH

Natasha Mullen, LPCMH works in a pilot program by the state of Delaware as a Behavioral Health Consultant. In this position, she provides counseling for middle school students. She also works as a coordinator and intensive outpatient counselor for Delaware guidance services, as a youth group leader, and as an instructor at Wilmington University. She is trained in TF-CBT, but has always wanted to learn the full foundation of CBT…
READ FULL ARTICLE

Use of CBT for Insomnia in Cancer Patients

Individuals with cancer are disproportionately affected by sleep disturbance and insomnia relative to the general population. These problems can be a consequence of the psychological, behavioral, and physical effects of a cancer diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia often persists for years and, when combined with already high levels of cancer-related distress, may place cancer survivors at a higher risk of future physical and mental health problems and poorer quality of life.…
READ FULL ARTICLE

Impact of CBT on Self-Efficacy in Panic Disorders

Cognitive models of panic disorder (PD) with or without agoraphobia have stressed the role of catastrophic beliefs of bodily symptoms as a central mediating variable of the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Perceived ability to cope with or control panic attacks, panic self-efficacy, has also been proposed to play a key role in therapeutic change; however, this cognitive factor has received much less attention in research. The aim of…
READ FULL ARTICLE

CBT for Aggressive Behavior in Young Male Offenders

This 9-week study was designed to determine whether a commercial cognitive-behavioral training program could effectively reduce overt aggression behavior in Chinese young male violent offenders. Sixty-six participants were randomly assigned to receive routine intervention alone (control group) or routine intervention plus Williams LifeSkills Training (WLST group) in a 1:1 ratio. The primary outcome was change scores on the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) from baseline to one week following end…
READ FULL ARTICLE

Use of CBT for Severe Mood Disorders in “Real World” Settings

The current study examined the effectiveness of brief cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for severe mood disorders in an acute naturalistic setting. The sample included 951 individuals with either major depressive disorder (n = 857) or bipolar disorder with depressed mood (n = 94). Participants completed a battery of self-report measures assessing depression, overall well-being, and a range of secondary outcomes both before and after treatment. We found significant reductions in…
READ FULL ARTICLE