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Month: October 2013

Beliefs, Self-focus, and Behavior Related to PTSD

In a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck explains how negative beliefs, points of focus, and behavior play a role in the development of PTSD. He gives an example describing how one's focus can lead to either an activation of negative beliefs or to adjustment. Join us for our specialty workshop on CBT for PTSD. For more information visit our website.
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Individual versus Group Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia

Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been identified as an effective treatment for primary insomnia, and according to a recent study published in Sleep and Biological Rhythms, individual CBT-I may be a superior treatment approach to group CBT-I. In the current study, researchers compared the short-term effectiveness of both individual and group CBT-I, in individuals who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for primary insomnia (i.e., a fear of insomnia, increased somatic tension, and…
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CBT Case Formulation

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses how identifying patients' beliefs, behaviors, and points of focus is an integral part of cognitive behavioral case formulation. Dr. Beck then provides an example to illustrate how beliefs, behaviors, and points of focus are interrelated and can lead to the activation of core beliefs. For CBT resources, visit our website.
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Ways to Elicit Automatic Thoughts

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses ways to elicit relevant automatic thoughts from clients. He gives examples of using imagery and in-vivo role-plays to teach clients how to identify automatic thoughts in session. Once clients learn how, they can begin to identify and modify interfering automatic thoughts throughout life. For CBT resources, visit our website.
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CBT Helps Prevent Depression in At-Risk Adolescents

Research from a randomized clinical trial recently published in JAMA Psychiatry indicates that group cognitive-behavioral prevention (CBP) may help prevent depression in at-risk adolescents. Participants included 316 adolescents with current or past elevated depressive symptoms and whose parents experienced current and/or prior depression. They were randomly assigned to either the CBP group or care as usual (CU). The CBP intervention consisted of eight weeks of weekly 90-minute group sessions, as…
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