A Monthly Summary of Beck Institute Updates [September 2013]

In its efforts to encourage the growth and dissemination of CBT throughout the world, Beck Institute has expanded its online presence across social media and other platforms. To keep you (our readers) informed of our most recent updates, we’ve decided to implement a monthly summary including: blogs, CBT articles, CBT trainings, and other updates for our readers. We’re very excited about some of the new developments at Beck Institute, including our new Core Curriculum. Please use the following links to go back and read what you may have missed from September 2013:

Click here for a complete schedule of Beck Institute workshops

See what you missed in August 2013

Child Perfectionism May Impact CBT Anxiety Treatment Outcomes

A recent study published in Behavior Research and Therapy investigated the effect of child perfectionism before treatment on the outcome of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for anxiety.  Perfectionism is typically defined as a trait involving personally demanding standards for performance.  Although a link has been found between perfectionism and adult anxiety treatment outcomes, there is a paucity of research on how perfectionism impacts CBT anxiety treatment in children.  Participants included 67 children ages 6-13 who were attending a group-based CBT program for their primary diagnoses of anxiety as part of a larger randomized controlled trial.  While perfectionism reduced following CBT anxiety treatment, higher levels of pre-treatment self-oriented perfectionism predicted higher levels of anxiety symptoms (self-reported) following treatment and at the 6-month follow up. Thus, some features of perfectionism may present as an obstacle for desirable treatment outcomes in children with anxiety.  Research is warranted to further understand the link between perfectionism and anxiety in children and how to enhance the ability to identify children at risk for anxiety and improve CBT interventions for anxious children.

Mitchell, J. H., Newall, C., Broeren, S., & Hudson, J. L. (September 01, 2013). The role of perfectionism in cognitive behaviour therapy outcomes for clinically anxious children. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 51, 9, 547-554.

Pretreatment Predictors of Dropout in War Veterans Receiving CBT for PTSD

Although research suggests that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is rather efficacious in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, CBT also appears to be limited by high rates of treatment attrition. A recent retrospective study published in Psychological Services examined differences between war veterans (Iraq and Afghanistan) who completed treatment versus those who dropped out of treatment.

Participants (N = 117) in the present study received outpatient CBT treatment for PTSD at a PTSD specialty clinic. Their clinical data was evaluated, and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) was utilized to predict treatment dropout. Dropout was defined as ending treatment before attaining the predetermined treatment goals set by the client and clinician.

According to results, approximately 68% of participants dropped out of treatment. Younger war Veterans were more likely to drop out from treatment than older veterans. Additionally, patients with high scores on MMPI-2 TRT scale, which measure discomfort with discussing problems and negative attitudes toward mental health treatment, were also more likely to drop out of treatment. Notably, war veterans who completed treatment showed reductions in PTSD symptom severity. These results suggest that age and negative attitudes toward mental health services can help predict treatment adherence in war veterans seeking treatment for PTSD.

Garcia, H. A., Kelley, L. P., Rentz, T. O., & Lee, S. (February 01, 2011). Pretreatment Predictors of Dropout From Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for PTSD in Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans. Psychological Services, 8, 1, 1-11.

The Theoretical Evolution of CBT

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the evolution of cognitive theory. Dr. Beck explains how this theory evolved from centralist, peripheralist, and primacy theories. From these theories, Dr. Beck ultimately developed the notion that core beliefs, which lead to negative thinking, are linked to the development of psychological disorders.

For CBT resources, visit www.beckinstitute.org.

A Cognitive Explanation for Anger and Hostility

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses insights from his conversation with the Dalai Lama. Dr. Beck talks about anger and hostility, and provides a hypothesis for why people overreact with anger in certain situations. He describes anger as an exaggerated response to automatic thoughts about being threatened or devalued,which are rooted in deeply held exaggerated beliefs.

For CBT resources, visit our website.

CBT Reduces Shame in Individuals with Social Anxiety Disorder

According to a recent study published in Plos One, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) may help reduce experiences of shame (specifically associated with how individuals judge themselves) among patients diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (SAD.) Participants (n= 161) in the current study were initially evaluated for experiences of shame, guilt, depression, and social anxiety. Participants diagnosed with SAD (n=67) were assigned to a CBT treatment condition; the remaining participants (n=94) were assigned to two samples of healthy controls. According to results, shame, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms were each associated in participants with SAD. Further, shame was shown to be elevated among SAD patients compared to the main healthy control. Following treatment, shame significantly reduced among participants with SAD. These findings suggest that shame and social anxiety are associated, that socially anxious patients may be more likely to experience shame than patients without social anxiety, and that CBT treatment can help reduce shame among individuals with SAD.

Hedman, E., Strom, P., Stunkel, A., & Mortberg, E. (April 19, 2013). Shame and Guilt in Social Anxiety Disorder: Effects of Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Association with Social Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms. Plos One, 8, 4.

Self-Focus in Cognitive Therapy

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses self-focus in Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Beck states that psychological disorders often involve some degree of self-focus. With health anxiety, for example, an over-focus on sensations in the body trigger irrational thoughts and beliefs. As patients become fixated on their bodily sensations, thoughts, and beliefs, their symptoms exacerbate. Mindfulness is one technique patients can use to help control their focus and distance themselves from fixations.

For CBT resources, visit Beck Institute’s CBT Store.

A Monthly Summary of Beck Institute Updates [August 2013]

In its efforts to encourage the growth and dissemination of CBT throughout the world, Beck Institute has expanded its online presence across social media and other platforms. To keep you (our readers) informed of our most recent updates, we’ve decided to implement a monthly summary including: blogs, CBT articles, CBT trainings, and other updates for our readers. We’re very excited about some of the new developments at Beck Institute, including our new Core Curriculum. Please use the following links to go back and read what you may have missed from August 2013:

Click here for a complete schedule of Beck Institute workshops

See what you missed in July 2013