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Month: December 2006

Alternatives to Drugs for Hyperactive Children? Psychotherapy Can Help

  A recent NY Times article talks about the prevalence of ADHD in children, and parents who want to avoid drugs like Ritalin. The American Psychological Association in fact recommends that parents consider non-drug treatment first for children. The article discusses one family that used new parenting techniques to help with their son's ADHD, and also says that Cognitive Behavior Therapy has been demonstrated to help teach children how to improve their anger, frustration, depression, and anxiety. We…
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Nurses Trained to use Cognitive Therapy with Children in Low-Income Communities

In a recent Philadelphia area pilot program, thirteen Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) were trained by the Beck Institute to use Cognitive Therapy techniques to treat mental and behavioral health problems of children and adolescents between the ages of 7 and 18. The APNs were the children's primary care providers in low-income populations, primary care providers are sometimes the only point of access for mental health care. For this program, APNs were trained by…
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Research Results: Cognitive Therapy Reduces Suicide Attempts by 50%

In light of all the recent discussion about antidepressant drugs that increase the risk of attempted suicide, we thought we'd highlight the study that came out last year, which showed that Cognitive Therapy (developed by Aaron T. Beck, M.D. in the 1960s) can reduce attempted suicide by 50% among those who have recently attempted suicide. This study, funded by the NIH and the CDC, followed 120 patients, half of whom were randomly…
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CT Myths: Three of the Most Common Misunderstandings about Cognitive Therapy

Myth: Cognitive Therapy (CT) is all about changing your thinking, and does not involve behavioral change. Fact: Actually, Cognitive Therapy (developed by Aaron T. Beck, M.D. in the 1960s) addresses your thinking, emotions, behaviors, and physiological symptoms (if applicable). Cognitive Therapy (CT) is called Cognitive Therapy because it is based on the premise that your underlying beliefs about yourself, others and the world influence the way you perceive situations, and prompt you to have certain thoughts,…
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Research Results: CBT is Effective for Seasonal Affective Disorder

Need help getting through the winter? This week's NY Times article says that Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is effective for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) with or without light therapy, and that CBT is actually better than light therapy in preventing relapse among SAD sufferers. The NY Times article refers to Dr. Kelly Rohan's initial pilot study of 23 individuals with SAD. Dr. Rohan conducted a larger randomized controlled trial of 61 patients with SAD in 2005,…
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What does Cognitive Therapy have to do with Nursing?

As Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) interact with patients who have health problems, many of them find that their patients also suffer from mental health problems, including depression, anxiety, and other illnesses. So how can APNs best address the mental health needs of their patients? Two articles published this fall in Medscape's Advanced Practice Nursing ejournal discuss how Cognitive Therapy (CT), also referred to as Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), is an effective, time-limited, clinically tested treatment that is ideal for nursing settings. (To view these articles, you have…
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